Omar and Edward. (And Tennyson, Browning, Christina Rossetti, Ruskin and Duke. )

Let’s take a rest from slagging the world’s great Epics. Here’s a podcast on The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam as ‘translated’ by Edward Fitzgerald. A link bonanza, it tackles authorship and ‘authenticity’, has insights into poetic technique and name-drops a gaggle of prominant Victorians. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b043xpkd https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/o/omar_khayyam/o54r/ http://www.iranchamber.com/literature/khayyam/rubaiyat_khayyam1.php http://www.britannica.com/biography/Omar-Khayyam-Persian-poet-and-astronomer http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/fitzgerald- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Byles_Cowell http://www.britannica.com/topic/Seljuq https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/lord-alfred-tennyson http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0124pnq I did … More Omar and Edward. (And Tennyson, Browning, Christina Rossetti, Ruskin and Duke. )

What have the Romans ever done for us?

It may be wonderfully written, chockers with nuance and ambiguity, and it may have inspired countless poets and scholars, but when the newly styled “Augustus” suggests a piece of propaganda, a foundation myth linking Rome to the perceived glories of ancient Greece, that’s precisely what you give him. http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/VirgilAeneidI.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeneid http://www.britannica.com/biography/Virgil http://www.britannica.com/biography/Augustus-Roman-emperor http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p003k9c1

Cricket

For some reason I always place John Cooper Clark and’Sketch for Summer’ together. Perhaps it’s a Manchester thing. Perhaps it’s a me in my twenties thing. Hung over. Sunday morning. Triple R on the dial. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cooper_Clarke https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Durutti_Column http://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/joe-king-buenaventura-durruti http://www.cyberspike.com/clarke/poemlist.html https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Buenaventura_Durruti

Tea

Robert Gray is the Thomas Hardy of Oz poetry. Not Thomas Hardy the poet. Thomas Hardy the novelist. Every detail is described lovingly and contextualized. Every detail bears an equal weight. Every detail is exquisite and excrutiating. In this one he gets it more or less right. The economy of the content demands an economical … More Tea